K A M S I N

it's a Redemption game

… it only takes two facing mirrors to construct a labyrinth.

Jorge Luis Borges, “Nightmares”, Seven Nights

This is the most important line I have read in literature of any kind. 

(via viperslang)

(Source: sacreamour, via elliebfierce)

It is hard to understand nothing, but the multiverse is full of it. Nothing travels everywhere, always ahead of something, and in the great cloud of unknowing nothing yearns to become something, to break out, to move, to feel, to change, to dance and to experience – in short, to be something.

Opening sentences from Raising Steam by Terry Pratchett (via ooksaidthelibrarian)

(Source: tadmad, via ooksaidthelibrarian)

centuriespast:

Burmese
Materials: Wood
Lacquer
Glass
Technique: Gilded
Inlaid
Iconography: Buddha
Penn Museum

centuriespast:

Burmese

Materials: Wood

Lacquer

Glass

Technique: Gilded

Inlaid

Iconography: Buddha

Penn Museum

The toughest thing about the shield was making it believable that [Captain America] could throw this thing, have it bounce off something, then take some guy out and have it come back to him. We tried some practical stuff, where he’s throwing a rubber shield. Nothing worked until we handed it over to Chris Evans, until we said, ‘Okay, we’ve got this shield. It’s this wide, it weighs this much. What would you do? How would you throw it?’ And he came up with some really interesting ways of doing it. He had nothing in his hands, he was just miming the actions. It was basically Chris Evans’ ability to mime throwing and catching the shield that made it work.”

- Joe Johnston, director, Captain America: The First Avenger

(Source: durance, via ooksaidthelibrarian)

nativeamericannews:

Emma Yepa – Jemez
Emma Yepa was born in 1968 and has been making pottery since 1987. She specializes in stone polished Swirl Melon bowls, and seed pots. She digs her clay from the Jemez Reservation, uses natural slips and fires her pottery outdoors and in a kiln. She was taught by her mother Ida Yepa. She comes from a very active family of potters, including her sister Marcella Yepa and her aunt Alvina Yepa.

nativeamericannews:

Emma Yepa – Jemez

Emma Yepa was born in 1968 and has been making pottery since 1987. She specializes in stone polished Swirl Melon bowls, and seed pots. She digs her clay from the Jemez Reservation, uses natural slips and fires her pottery outdoors and in a kiln. She was taught by her mother Ida Yepa. She comes from a very active family of potters, including her sister Marcella Yepa and her aunt Alvina Yepa.